“Oh, THAT Chestnut!” Gay Christian Logic

I believe the day has past when the answer to homosexuality was simply read them the “clobber” texts (the seven or so Scripture passages that condemn homosexuality). It’s not that the Bible does not have power. It does. The problem is that the so-called gay Christian community completely reinterprets those passages in a way that supports their lifestyles.

So, if a simple reading of the Biblical texts is not working, what are we to do? That’s a great question. I will let you know when I have a definitive answer. In the meantime, my conviction is that the battle for our culture (and not simply where it concerns homosexuality) is being waged on philosophical, academic grounds. Accordingly, I have for some time now been cataloging the logic on display in the many, many books, articles, and videos available from those who are pro-gay, pro-abortion, pro-evolution, etc.

With that in mind, I want to share some of the underpinning gay Christian  “moral logic” (as James V. Brownson, author of Bible, Gender, Sexuality, is fond of referring to) that I have encountered in recent weeks.

Ancient Means Sinful, Contemporary Means Righteous

This particular chestnut of wisdom says that the Bible, where it condemns same-sex activity, is not talking about loving, monogamous, committed same-sex relationships like we see in our world today. This has become a defeater belief (click here for an excerpt from D. A. Carson’s book, The Intolerance of Tolerance, where he defines what a defeater belief is). Essentially, a defeater belief is one that, when believed, rules out any belief to the contrary. If A is true, then B can’t possibly be true. Therefore, since I believe A, I can discount B altogether. The gay Christians can therefore dismiss any assertion that the Bible is against homosexuality by claiming that it is only speaking of unhealthy same-sex activity, i.e., temple prostitution, etc. No matter what may be said about the Biblical texts that prohibit and condemn homosexuality, the final salvo fired is, “That passage is not addressing loving, monogamous, committed same-sex relationships.”

Good Tree/Good Fruit

Based on the Jesus’ “good tree/good fruit, bad tree/bad fruit” teaching, Dan O. Via writes in Homosexuality and the Bible, “If the heart is loving, the acts that flow from it cannot be evil….The inner nature of a homosexual relationship does qualify the acts (Quoted by Brownson in Bible, Gender, Sexuality).” Matthew Vines, currently a rising star in defending homosexuality and gay Christianity, explains,

Every good tree bears good fruit, but a bad tree bears bad fruit. . . . Good teachings, according to Jesus, have good consequences. . . . Good teachings, even when they are very difficult, are not destructive to human dignity. They don’t lead to emotional and spiritual devastation, and to the loss of self-esteem and self-worth. But those have been the consequences for gay people of the traditional teaching on homosexuality. It has not borne good fruit in their lives, and it’s caused them incalculable pain and suffering. If we’re taking Jesus seriously that bad fruit cannot come from a good tree, then that should cause us to question whether the traditional teaching is correct (From a manuscript of Vine’s video sermon).

As they love to say here in New York, “You can’t make this stuff up!” If your self-esteem and self-worth are founded on a sexual orientation that is forbidden by Scripture what do you suppose will happen if someone comes by and informs you of that? So, if I help someone commit suicide, or if I commit adultery, or pederasty for that matter (look it up), I am not sinning as long as I am loving in my heart towards that person. Amazing that we have not yet seen fire and brimstone falling in America!

The Exchange

I don’t care what anybody says, this next one is very creative! In Romans 1:26-27, Paul says,

Even their women exchanged natural relations for unnatural ones. In the same way the men also abandoned natural relations with women and were inflamed with lust for one another.

The key word is exchanged. According to gay Christian logic, Paul was talking about heterosexuals engaging in same-sex activity, which violated their God-given nature or orientations. However, gay persons are “naturally” attracted to people of the same-sex, thus not violating their natures or orientations when they engage in same-sex behavior.

One must accept the premise that homosexuals were born that way for this to make sense, which I don’t. If they were not born that way, then they have indeed “exchanged” the normal for the abnormal whether they were conscious of the choice to do so or not. The onus is upon any of us: when we realize we are out of the way before God it is up to us to present ourselves to Him and allow Him to dictate how we will live and how we are to proceed.

The “Jesus never said it!” Approach

A transgender person made this statement in a comment on one of my blog entries, Why the Focus on Homosexuality . . . 

Jesus said that if a man look at a woman with lust in his heart, he had already committed adultery. He did not say the same if a man look at a man.

The utter nonsense of such a statement should be obvious. If we took this statement as true, we would have to assume that Jesus’ was saying that it is not OK for a man to lust after a woman but it is OK for a man to lust after another man!

Any thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 

The Sinking Ship of Evangelicalism, Part I: The problem

The Evening Descends
The Evening Descends (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By Scott Fowler

Behind the Times

According to Stanley Hauerwas and William H. Willimon (Resident Aliens), Christendom, having begun with Constantine in 313 AD, ended in 1963.1 I can still remember the inner conflict I experienced the first time I heard that Christendom was dead or that we were living in a post-Christian era. It was well after 1963 when the news came to me. I was young and rather uninitiated into mainstream theological discussions, but even after I heard and understood those statements, I encountered many others who had not heard either. In fact, I am sure that I could still find many even today who do not understand what is meant by post-Christendom or for that matter what Christendom means. My point? The average evangelical normally runs at least twenty to forty years behind the times. With that said, there is another seismic shift happening in the church today. Perhaps it is more like an implosion or, better yet, a radiation accident that everyone is trying to escape before it gets lethal.

The Demise of Evangelicalism

It is not often that one is afforded the opportunity to witness the end of an era. On November 9, 1989, the Berlin Wall fell. Not all at once, to be sure, but it fell. Those of us alive at that time witnessed the end of an era. Today, we are witnessing the end of an era in the Church—the end of evangelicalism. But once again, most of us are late getting the message.

The seeds for the demise of evangelicalism have been in the sod for quite some time. I only began to be aware of it last year, though I have been cognizant of its problems for longer than that. For me, the concept of post-evangelicalism came when I recently heard an interview Phyllis Tickle gave to Gabe Lyons for the Next Christians video series. I was alarmed, did further research on Phyllis Tickle, and was yet more alarmed. So, I read her book, The Great Emergence. That’s when I realized that I did not want to be labeled by the word evangelical anymore.

Now, consequently, Phyllis Tickle doesn’t want to be called an evangelical either. In fact, it would seem that the term evangelical is being abandoned like a sinking ship leaving nothing but an empty hull behind. Where it gets interesting is deciding what we are abandoning evangelicalism for. But I’m getting ahead of myself . . .

Politics

Some are abandoning evangelicalism for political reasons. The fabled evangelical block of power failed conservatives in the last two major elections. Now, with evangelicals being more and more labeled as extremists, I expect to see the Republican Party begin moving away from evangelicals and moving to the left—at least far enough to get back in the game.2

 Emergence Christianity

Some are abandoning evangelicalism because they feel that they are part of a historically significant movement, namely emergence Christianity. Among two of the disturbing claims made by Tickle in her interviews and books is that the concept sola Scriptura (Scripture only as our final source of authority) is all but dead, and that the Church will “get over” its rejection of homosexuality and, presumably, will make room for gay Christianity (not a surprising perspective coming from a lay Eucharistic minister and lector in the Episcopal Church).3 Though Tickle has an uncanny ability to speak articulately and yet leave you wondering if she has answered the question, she nevertheless does not seem to be a reporter for the “sans-sola-Scriptura/pro-homosexual” brand of emergence Christianity but rather a strong advocate for and participant in it. All of this is coupled with a staunch reinvigoration within emergence Christianity of a bottom-up, social gospel.

Theistic Evolution

Some are abandoning evangelicalism by virtue of their errant doctrines as can be witnessed at biologos.org where there is strong advocacy for embracing theistic evolution by self-proclaimed Bible-believing, Christians. The issue here is not a quibbling over age/day theories, but whether or not humanity sprung from one original mated pair (Adam and Eve), etc.

The Antagonistic “Insiders”

Some are abandoning evangelicalism by virtue of their rejection of its tenets. In other words, their complaints about evangelicals seem to have led them into being something else, though they do not admit it. In many ways these could be characterized as “bullies” who have an “insider’s” axe to grind against evangelicals. These people present themselves (and in some cases are represented by the media) as evangelicals, but when they speak they don’t sound like evangelicals.4 At least they don’t sound like we used to. So, the Church gets saddled with “experts” who seem more like Trojan horses than true arbiters of wisdom coming from within genuine evangelical spirituality.

Gay Christianity

Along with a reinvigorated secular push towards the nation-wide acceptance of same-sex marriage (helped along in no small way by the fact that, in his second inaugural address, President Barrack Obama decided to elevate a bar fight in New York City to the same level as the fight for racial equality when he mentioned Seneca Falls, Selma, and Stonewall all in the same breath),5 there is an astonishing tide of momentum gathering behind the idea of gay Christianity. As mentioned above, proponents from the orthonomic branch of emergence Christianity6 are helping to lead the way. But, other lesser known influences are cropping up all over the place. Sandra Turnbull,7 a Assemblies of God-raised and educated8 lesbian pastor of the Glory Tabernacle Christian Center, has written a book titled God’s Gay Agenda in which she declares,

Today, I know who I am. I am a eunuch born this way from my mother’s womb. I have a destiny in God. I have a high-calling that I am pursuing along with my life partner. Love fills my life. I have a wonderful family and a great Church. And to think that all of this was made possible because my life was turned upside down many years ago when I found myself in the eye of a storm— a storm about my sexuality.9

Turnbull is not alone. A perusal of Rachel Held Evans’ blog site (an author published by Thomas Nelson) reveals her support of gay Christianity as this quote, written concerning the infamous Chick-Fil-A boycott:

I am especially sorry to my LGBT friends who have been bullied in the name of Christ—many of you as Christians  yourself—and I long for the Church to become a more welcoming home to all who want to follow Jesus, regardless of race, gender, socio-economic status, or sexual orientation. . . . As Christians—conservative and progressive, gay and straight, activists and slacktivists—we must direct our efforts instead toward bridging this divide, which is going to take a lot of hard work, a lot of disappointment, a lot of tears, a lot of compromise, a lot of honesty, a lot of mistakes, a lot of apologies, a lot of listening, a lot of forgiveness, a lot of meal sharing, a lot of gospel.10 

When I expressed concern to Thomas Nelson publishers, who published Evans’ recent book, their response was:

 The personal opinions and political views expressed by an author are theirs alone and do not necessarily reflect that of the company. Thomas Nelson publishes products written from a Christian worldview, and we respect our author’s right to express their personal opinion. We cannot comment on anything concerning Ms. Evans other than the book that she has published through us.11

There are so many more examples like the recent article in the Atlantic, Being Gay at Jerry Falwell’s University. Forgetting for now the question of how any Christian should respond when put in the situation of the author’s professors at Liberty University, you can’t help but anticipate the coming battle when you read,

Eventually, though, I decided that if Jesus met me some time, and if he got to know me, and hear my ideas, and listen to me laugh, then he would like me. What made me come to that conclusion? Meeting people like Dr. Prior and Dr. Reeves. All these people—including Jerry Falwell—helped teach me about Jesus, and I figured that if they liked me, then maybe Jesus might, too. Gandhi once said that he liked Christ, but not Christians because they were so unlike their leader. But the people I met at Liberty… well, Gandhi would have liked them.12

Well, it’s nice to be liked. Jesus more than likes us, He loves us with an everlasting love (Psalm 100:5; John 3:16). But what does that mean to the author? If Jesus “likes” you does that mean He accepts you? Does that mean that you were created to be a homosexual? Sandra Turnbull thinks so.

What about the youth pastor from Texas who writes in his blog,

I have homosexuals who come to my youth ministry regularly. Some of them passionately love Jesus. I have seen their lives and their hearts, and I know that they have a real relationships with God. Do homosexuals who loves [sic] God go to heaven? I know it. Do they have real relationships with God? Undeniably. . . . If you are a homosexual (teen) and have felt judged, criticized and hurt by church, come to [my youth group]. If you’re afraid to step into church because you’ve experienced alienation in the past… come to [my youth group].

I hope I am wrong about this young pastor, but I think he just planted the seeds for a gay church!

The Believing Church

Evangelical doesn’t seem to mean what it used to mean. More accurately, it is being co-opted by many groups that do not hold to what used to be known as traditional evangelical values. OK. I am not married to the term evangelical but I am concerned that the believing Church identify itself in an ever-changing atmosphere of heresy and compromise.

 

Notes

1 This is a tongue-in-cheek general reference by H & W.

2 In the lapse of time since this was written several articles have been written documenting the movement of Republicans towards the left of center for the sake of remaining viable politically, particularly on the subject of gay marriage. To be clear, my main issue with public support of same-sex marriage is that it places homosexuality in the category of normal behavior and as a Bible believing Christian I cannot endorse that. The question of human rights is a separate issue. For that reason, I do not say to the LGBT community that they cannot practice whatever sexual behavior they may desire. I don’t agree with it and I reserve the right to say so and to warn against such behavior. But asking me to endorse it, support it, normalize it, even Christianize it goes beyond what the true meaning of tolerance calls for.

3 See her website at http://www.phyllistickle.com/about/

Simply read the writings of Mark Noll, Rob Bell, Rachel Held Evans, Jonathan Dudley and others.

5 Selma, Alabama played a key role in the Civil Rights movement, Seneca Falls was the birthplace of the Women’s Rights movement, and Stonewall is a Greenwich Village gay bar in Manhattan where it is said “gay pride began.”

6 In her book The Great Emergence (pages 149-150), Phyllis Tickle describes two approaches or views of authority happening within emergence Christianity. One is “orthonomy” which is “the tendency . . . [to allow] aesthetic response and/or emotionally or spiritually moving experience to become bases for authority. The other is “theonomy” meaning that “only God can be the source of perfection in action and thought.” Now, presumably this means using the Bible as the final authority. Tickle, however, says “neither is sufficient by itself.”

7 See these websites for more information about Turnbull and her book and her church: http://sandra-turnbull.com/endorsements/http://glorytabernacle.com/index.html ; http://www.amazon.com/Gods-Gay-Agenda-ebook/dp/B009KUREQE.

8 The Amazon site for her book contains a short bio of Turnbull which claims she was educated at Evangel College and Claremont School of theology. Her website mentions her Assemblies of God missionary parents. I confess that I am assuming that Evangel College must refer to what is today called Evangel University, an Assemblies of God school which began as Evangel College in 1955 (see previous footnote for these websites).

9 Turnbull, Sandra (2012-10-01). God’s Gay Agenda (Kindle Locations 173-176). Glory Publishing. Kindle Edition.

10 http://rachelheldevans.com/blog/chick-fil-a

11 My concern at the time was that Evans is being presented as an evangelical Christian and being endorsed by a leading evangelical Christian publishing house, yet holding views that are inconsistent with an evangelical Christian worldview. Thomas Nelson’s claim that they publish products written from a Christian worldview while showing no interest in any personal opinion expressed outside of what was being published reflects either that Thomas Nelson thinks gay Christianity is part of the Christian worldview or that somehow it is excusable to compartmentalize what we sell separately from what we say or think personally. My view is that one’s everyday worldview needs to agree with our “sales pitch.”

12 http://www.theatlantic.com/sexes/archive/2013/04/being-gay-at-jerry-falwells-university/274578/

Scott Fowler is the founder of the Christ and Culture Initiative. He is a pastor/theologian living in New York. You can learn more about him at:  http://scottythinks.wordpress.com/about/